WHEN SHOULD YOU PRUNE YOUR SHRUBS? - Cheap Georgia Mulch | Alpharetta Mulch | Milton Mulch
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WHEN SHOULD YOU PRUNE YOUR SHRUBS?

WHEN SHOULD YOU PRUNE YOUR SHRUBS?

Pruning might not sound like a complicated task; you’re just hacking away at dead or dried-looking branches and overgrowth, right? Like many other homeowners, you may try to tackle the pruning of your shrubs, trees, and flower bushes in the autumn when you winterize other aspects of your property.

But fall is actually not a very good time to get your pruning done. Why not? And when should you prune your shrubs?

Prune Anytime but the Fall!

Pruning triggers a flow of sap in plants and jumpstarts their growth systems. But this isn’t the right time for plants to try growing; they need to be settling down as they lie dormant through the winter. The unnecessary growth spurt can weaken the plants and they won’t have enough energy to thrive come spring.

Best Time to Prune Your Plants

Right now is the perfect time! The dead of winter is an excellent time to prune because the shrubs have already fallen dormant. They may have lost all their leaves, which incidentally makes it easier for you to see what you’re doing.

Pruning keeps plants healthy and beautiful and encourages lush flower and fruit production. Just make sure that you do it at the right time!

Don’t have time to prune your shrubs right now?

To maintain a healthy and beautiful lawn, contact an experienced lawn services team in the Milton area. Here at Nature’s Management Group, we have the tools and knowledge and experience to keep your home grounds appealing.

Our lawn services include winter pruning to ensure strong plants come springtime. Call us today to learn more about our landscaping services in Milton and the surrounding areas.

Posted on Behalf of Nature’s Management Group

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